Any parent, teacher, older sibling or babysitter knows how difficult it can be to communicate with children.  Regardless of their age, children always seem to have some sort of roadblock on the pathway to open and understanding communication which is enough to drive many of us to want to bang our own heads of that proverbial wall of frustration.  Toddlers haven’t yet developed the ability to see the world from someone else’s perspective.  Young school children are testing their boundaries.  Teenagers think they have it all figured out.

Have you been dealing with tantrums?  Slamming doors?  Stomping feet?  A defiant teenager who acts as he or she pleases?  Or are you just unsure of how to approach a difficult conversation?  The following is a list of my Top 10 Picks for advice and ideas on how to create an open communication pathway – free of roadblocks – with the child in your life.

Of course, these are only starting points.  These are ideas to inspire and motivate you.  The real work will come when you whittle them down to ideas which will be most useful for your situation with your child.  You will, most likely, have to get creative and come up with a few of your own ideas to test.  Still, a starting point is a good thing.  How does anything ever get finished if it never gets started?

  1. Quick and Positive Techniques for Effective Communication With Your Children

    In this article, the wonderful people from Positive-Parenting-Skills.net explore ideas for effectively and positively communicating with small children and toddlers.  They look at concepts such as getting down on your child’s level without letting go of your authority.

  2. Talking About Tough Topics

    Raisingchildren.net – The Australian Parenting Website shared this article full of advice for talking to children of all ages (even teens) about difficult-to-approach topics such as divorce, death, sex and trauma.

  3. Communicating With Young Children

    In this publication for Virginia Cooperative Extension (a Virginia State University Publication), education specialist Peggy O. Harrelson shares strategies for speaking to and with children in general and in conflict to create a cooperative two-way stress of open communication.

  4. Dealing with Power Struggles

    Karen Sims, from Positive Parenting, uses this article to provide ideas and advice for handling power struggles with children of all ages.  From toddlers to teenagers, Sims acknowledges that all parent-child relationships are full of conflict and struggle.  In this article, she talks about techniques such as side-stepping and giving choices.

  5. The Gift of A Strong-Willed Child

    In this article, L. R. Knost explores the challenges and blessing of strong-willed children and offers concrete ideas for effectively communicating with and parenting challenging children.

  6. Communicating with Children: Principles and Practices to Nurture, Inspire, Excite, Educate and Heal

    This comprehensive 96-page review of information and guidelines related to children’s media may seem unimportant to parenting, but it contains a lot of potentially helpful information about learning, development and levels of understanding which may assist parents, teachers and other caregivers in discerning how to best communicate with their children.

  7. Communicating Effectively with Children

    Writing for the University of Missouri, Sarah Traub, a human development and fam science specialist, tackles the topic of communicating with children from birth to teenage years.  She discusses listening, getting down on your child’s developmental level, labelling and discussing emotions, encouraging storytelling, explaining rules and the positive effects of written communication.

  8. 8 Strategies for Dealing with a Defiant Child

    This article from quickanddirtytips.com discusses the applicability of concepts such as accountability, acting versus reacting and the negative effects of bargaining.

 


1Founder and Editor: Amy-Lynn Vautour

A graduate from Athabasca University (Honour’s Bachelor of Psychology), and a former group facilitator at center for women, I am currently excited to be pursuing my career as a blogger, freelance writer and author. I am an avid reader and enjoy creating visual and musical art in my spare time. I enjoy meditating, reading, hiking, mountain biking, and gathering around the dining room table to play board games with my family.

About The Author

A graduate from Athabasca University (Honour’s Bachelor of Psychology), and a former group facilitator at center for women, I am currently excited to be pursuing my career as a blogger, freelance writer and author. I am an avid reader and enjoy creating visual and musical art in my spare time. I enjoy meditating, reading, hiking, mountain biking, and gathering around the dining room table to play board games with my family.

Related Posts

2 Responses

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.